All Dressed Up and No Prison CEO To Debate

Last week, we challenged Damon Hininger, the head of Corrections Corporation of America – the world’s largest for-profit incarceration company – to a debate on the merits of prison privatization. Today, Mother Jones reported that the company is shrinking from the challenge.

We invited Hininger to tell us, in a 90-minute public debate with equal time given to each side, why he thinks we’re wrong to call for the elimination of for-profit incarceration. As we wrote to Hininger: “If you truly believe that private prisons are right for our country, we see no reason why you would be unwilling to defend that position in a public debate.”

These are the views we invited CCA to refute in a public forum:

 Evidence that for-profit prisons save taxpayer money is mixed at best, and privatization cannot fix the nation's binge spending on incarceration. Indeed, the industry's business model depends on extracting as much public money as possible by locking up the maximum number of people.

 Private prisons have incentives to maximize profits by cutting corners at the expense of decent conditions and public safety. Empirical research supports the view that private prisons pay correctional officers lower wages, resulting in higher turnover and less experienced staff.

 New prisons, whether public or private, deliver few benefits to local communities.

And here from CCA to answer the challenge, debate these assertions, and expose them as bunk is . . .

Well, no one.

If you think you deserve to know the truth about what CCA is doing with your taxpayer dollars, go here and urge Hininger to accept our invitation.

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promaint

With the prison riot this past weekend in Miss. at a CCA facility, this topic is very timely. I’ll bet Mr.Hininger won’t be responding to your request for a debate any time soon. The business model of privatizing corrections facilities in the long term is a no win situation. Trying to turn a profit requires CCA to - 1. Cut corners
2. reduce staff
3. reduce wages
4. hire inexperienced staff
5. compromise the safety of the inmates, staff, and surrounding residents
6. keep residency around 90-95% capacity
Already having a track record of issues at their 60 facilities ( 75,000 inmates), I don’t see the value in this business model. Along with the above examples, CCA is spending $millions to lobby the likes Federal Bureau of Prisons ( FBP ), Dept. of Immigration & Customs ( ICE ), Dept. Of Homeland Security ( DHS ), Dept. of Justice ( DoJ ), and both houses of Congress for funding and occupancy.
The real question here is “where is the profit in this business model ?”. It’s in the contracts for construction of the facilities and goes to the likes of 1. KBR and 2. Halliburton, defense contractors with a track record of privatizing the War in Iraq. Money is made in padded contracts and tax exemptions. Check out the documentary “Iraq For Sale – The War Profeteers”. Also go to “Project on Government Oversight” ( POGO ).org and check out their “Federal Contractor Misconduct Database” for information on KBR & Halliburton. These are the same contractors that built the internment/ rendition camps for both the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Currently KBR is lobbying the govt. in the United Kingdom to privatize their police forces (opendemacracy.net). The profits come out in the front end of the privatization model. Defense contractors have been able to manipulate and lobby within their environment to create a perpetual growth industry, no matter what shape the country’s economy is in! They even have the House of Representatives legislating for increased spending for defense with 2 wars winding down – great for the DOD and all of it’s contractors.

toughnuts

With the prison riot this past weekend in Miss. at a CCA facility, this topic is very timely. I’ll bet Mr.Hininger won’t be responding to your request for a debate any time soon. The business model of privatizing corrections facilities in the long term is a no win situation. Trying to turn a profit requires CCA to - 1. Cut corners
2. reduce staff
3. reduce wages
4. hire inexperienced staff
5. compromise the safety of the inmates, staff, and surrounding residents
6. keep residency around 90-95% capacity
Already having a track record of issues at their 60 facilities ( 75,000 inmates), I don’t see the value in this business model. Along with the above examples, CCA is spending $millions to lobby the likes Federal Bureau of Prisons ( FBP ), Dept. of Immigration & Customs ( ICE ), Dept. Of Homeland Security ( DHS ), Dept. of Justice ( DoJ ), and both houses of Congress for funding and occupancy.
The real question here is “where is the profit in this business model ?”. It’s in the contracts for construction of the facilities and goes to the likes of 1. KBR and 2. Halliburton, defense contractors with a track record of privatizing the War in Iraq. Money is made in padded contracts and tax exemptions. Check out the documentary “Iraq For Sale – The War Profeteers”. Also go to “Project on Government Oversight” ( POGO ).org and check out their “Federal Contractor Misconduct Database” for information on KBR & Halliburton. These are the same contractors that built the internment/ rendition camps for both the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Currently KBR is lobbying the govt. in the United Kingdom to privatize their police forces (opendemacracy.net). The profits come out in the front end of the privatization model. Defense contractors have been able to manipulate and lobby within their environment to create a perpetual growth industry, no matter what shape the country’s economy is in’s contractors. ! They even have the House of Representatives legislating for increased spending for defense with 2 wars winding down – great for the DOD and all of it

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