Blog of Rights

Amy
Fettig
Amy Fettig serves as Senior Staff Counsel for the ACLU’s National Prison Project (NPP).
 
At NPP, she litigates federal class action prison conditions cases under the Eighth Amendment. Her practice focuses on claims regarding medical and mental health care in prison, solitary confinement, prison rape, and comprehensive reform in juvenile facilities. Ms. Fettig also directs the ACLU’s Stop Solitary campaign seeking to end the practice of long-term isolation in our nation’s prisons, jails and juvenile detention centers through public policy reform, legislation, litigation and public education.
 
Ms. Fettig is a leading member of the national coalition seeking to end the practice of shackling pregnant women prisoners and works with a wide range of ACLU affiliates on both anti-shackling campaigns and their advocacy strategies around women’s health in prison. A national expert on prisoner rights law, she provides technical legal assistance and advice to advocacy groups and lawyers around the country and has served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where she teaches courses on public interest advocacy.
 
Prior to law school, Ms. Fettig worked with women prisoners, ex-prisoners and their families in New York City. She holds a B.A., with distinction, Carleton College; a Master’s from Columbia University, School of International and Public Affairs; and a J.D. from Georgetown University. Ms. Fettig is a member of the New York State Bar (2002) and the Bar for the District of Columbia (2006).
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16 and Solitary: Texas Jails Isolate Children

16 and Solitary: Texas Jails Isolate Children

By Amy Fettig, ACLU National Prison Project & Matt Simpson, ACLU of Texas at 3:06pm
Imagine locking a teenager in a bathroom for an entire day, a week, a month, six months, a year, or longer. What would happen to that child? She would miss school. She wouldn't be able to exercise or burn off energy in a healthy way. She wouldn't be able to interact with other kids or adults. She would probably have a mental breakdown. She might even hurt herself. If a parent treated a child this way, most of us would agree that such actions would constitute child abuse. In Texas county jails — and the majority of jails across the country — such treatment is simply a matter of routine.
Justice Department Takes First Steps to Protect Kids from Rape

Justice Department Takes First Steps to Protect Kids from Rape

By Amy Fettig, ACLU National Prison Project at 11:41am

In 2003, Congress took an important first step in addressing a national tragedy: epidemic levels of rape and sexual abuse in our nation’s prisons, jails and youth detention centers. The Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), passed unanimously…

Solitary Confinement Destroys All Kinds of People

Solitary Confinement Destroys All Kinds of People

By Amy Fettig, ACLU National Prison Project at 4:01pm

An American woman recounts her time in solitary confinement in an Iranian prison, an experience endured by thousands of prisoners here in the U.S.

Starving For Better Conditions in California Prisons

By Amy Fettig, ACLU National Prison Project at 12:54pm

How terrible would things have to be for you to stop eating and possibly starve yourself to death? For prisoners in California, their conditions of confinement — severe and prolonged isolation in small, windowless concrete boxes — have…

Justice and Faith Groups say "Enough is Enough" to Attorney General

By Amy Fettig, ACLU National Prison Project at 10:24am

Yesterday, the ACLU and a broad coalition of civil rights and religious groups called on Attorney General Eric Holder to take a stand for safe, humane, and effective criminal justice in the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) when he selects its new…

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