Blog of Rights

Catherine
Crump

Catherine Crump (@CatherineNCrumpclerked for the Hon. M. Margaret McKeown, a judge on U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, prior to joining the ACLU. Crump graduated from Stanford University and Stanford Law School. She is a non-residential fellow with the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

Better Than a Tinfoil Hat

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 4:06pm
Wired’s ThreatLevel blog published a list of “9 Reasons Wired Readers Should Wear Tinfoil Hats.” Well, that’s one option. But if you’re concerned about Big Brother tracking Americans’ movements or rifling through our laptops, why not support the ACLU instead?
How the Supreme Court's GPS Tracking Case Can Affect Your Cell Phone Privacy

How the Supreme Court's GPS Tracking Case Can Affect Your Cell Phone Privacy

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:34pm

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will confront the profound impact of new location-tracking technologies on Americans' privacy.

Schools Can Teach Tolerance and Honor Free Speech

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 11:53am

Yesterday, the Knoxville News Sentinel ran our editorial explaining why a federal appeals court should reconsider a recent decision that sharply limits the free speech rights of public school students.  The ACLU has asked the court to consider…

Cell Phone Companies Reveal How Much Cops Love Your Phone

Cell Phone Companies Reveal How Much Cops Love Your Phone

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 12:06pm

Cellphones are the spies in our pockets, gathering information about whom we befriend, what we say, where we go, and what we read. That’s why Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., recently asked the nation’s major cellphone companies to disclose how frequently they receive requests from law enforcement for customer call records—including the content of communications, numbers dialed, websites visited, and location data. Sometimes police have a warrant, sometimes they don’t.

Seven companies provided information in response to the inqury. The letters Markey received, which were covered today in the Boston Globe, Washington Post, and New York Times, show that the quantity of requests for these records is staggering. T-Mobile and AT&T together received nearly 600,000 requests for customer information in 2012. AT&T has to employ more than 100 full-time workers to process them. And police demand for our call records is growing rapidly, with requests to Verizon doubling in the last five years.

This piece was originally published on Slate. Click here to read the full article.

The Vast, Troubling Call Database Drug Agents Use to Identify Burner Phones

The Vast, Troubling Call Database Drug Agents Use to Identify Burner Phones

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 4:43pm

This week the New York Times revealed the Hemisphere Project, in which the government is paying AT&T for access to an enormous phone records database. While some aspects of the program are unclear, we now know that the government has long collaborated with AT&T to conduct sophisticated data-mining of sensitive telephone records, primarily to identify “burner” phones.

ACLU Asks Appeals Court to Reconsider Cell Phone Tracking Decision

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:22pm

Yesterday we asked the full Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals to consider the arguments in our amicus brief that it should rehear a case decided by a three-judge panel in a ruling last month that undermined the privacy rights of everyone who carries a…

Monitoring Internet Usage Patterns Has Privacy Implications Too

Monitoring Internet Usage Patterns Has Privacy Implications Too

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 4:34pm

The New York Times Sunday Review included a striking op ed suggesting that universities could one day deploy software to analyze students’ internet usage for the purpose of assessing their mental health. The writers, Sriram Chellappan and Raghavendra…

Surveillance Drones Coming to a Police Department Near You

Surveillance Drones Coming to a Police Department Near You

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 5:51pm

If there had been any doubt about drones being used for aerial surveillance inside the U.S., those doubts were dispelled when Congress passed and the president signed a law requiring the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to integrate drones…

Justice Department Avoids Decision On Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking

Justice Department Avoids Decision On Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 3:04pm

Federal law enforcement has used people’s cell phones to track their movements for at least a decade, but even today there is no clear answer to whether the government needs a warrant to do so. Why? In part because the U.S. Justice Department…

Justices Press Government on Limits of Warrantless Location Tracking

Justices Press Government on Limits of Warrantless Location Tracking

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 9:48am

Yesterday the Supreme Court heard argument in an important case that confronts how to apply Fourth Amendment's protections against unreasonable searches and seizures to new technologies.

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