Blog of Rights

Catherine
Crump

Catherine Crump (@CatherineNCrumpclerked for the Hon. M. Margaret McKeown, a judge on U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, prior to joining the ACLU. Crump graduated from Stanford University and Stanford Law School. She is a non-residential fellow with the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

Better Than a Tinfoil Hat

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 4:06pm
Wired’s ThreatLevel blog published a list of “9 Reasons Wired Readers Should Wear Tinfoil Hats.” Well, that’s one option. But if you’re concerned about Big Brother tracking Americans’ movements or rifling through our laptops, why not support the ACLU instead?

Surveillance Programs Must Not Be Kept Secret

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:07pm

Technology moves so fast today that surveillance programs can now become routine before the public even learns of them. That is a problem because new surveillance programs can involve difficult value judgments and tradeoffs. How valuable are those…

What the Government Wants to Know About You

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 4:32pm

Earlier this month, news broke that the government got a court order to force Twitter to reveal the private account information of some people associated with WikiLeaks. What is unusual about the situation is not that the government obtained such…

Take Three: Appellate Court Hears Challenge to Internet Censorship . . . Again

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 10:14am

A sense of déjà vu pervaded the courtroom in Philadelphia yesterday as the ACLU presented its challenge to the Child Online Protection Act . . . again. This is not the first or the second, but the third time the ACLU has been before…

ACLU Asks Appeals Court to Reconsider Cell Phone Tracking Decision

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:22pm

Yesterday we asked the full Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals to consider the arguments in our amicus brief that it should rehear a case decided by a three-judge panel in a ruling last month that undermined the privacy rights of everyone who carries a…

Judge to Feds: To Track Cell Phones, Get a Warrant

Judge to Feds: To Track Cell Phones, Get a Warrant

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 3:33pm

In a victory for the privacy rights of everyone with a cell phone, a court has held that law enforcement agents must get a warrant to access cell phone location records. The ACLU, ACLU of Texas and Electronic Frontier Foundation submitted a brief…

Tracked: The Supreme Court Shouldn't Let Technology Trump the Constitution

Tracked: The Supreme Court Shouldn't Let Technology Trump the Constitution

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 12:59pm

This term the Supreme Court will determine if the government needs to establish probable cause and obtain a warrant before attaching a GPS device to a person's car.

A Win For Protesters’ Rights

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 6:23pm

Today a federal district court judge in New Mexico handed down a great ruling for protesters' rights. Some background is in order: All throughout George W. Bush's presidency, we at the ACLU received complaints from protesters. Time and again,…

Federal Judge Finds Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking Unconstitutional

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 1:33pm

In August, we blogged about a court decision from the federal court in the Eastern District of New York that held that law enforcement agents are constitutionally obligated to get a warrant based on probable cause before obtaining historical cell…

Cell Phone Users: Your Privacy is at Risk

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:59pm

(Originally posted on Philly.com)

If you own a cell phone, you should care about the outcome of a case scheduled to be argued in federal appeals court in Philadelphia tomorrow. It could well decide whether the government can use your cell…

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