Blog of Rights

Catherine
Crump

Catherine Crump (@CatherineNCrumpclerked for the Hon. M. Margaret McKeown, a judge on U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, prior to joining the ACLU. Crump graduated from Stanford University and Stanford Law School. She is a non-residential fellow with the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.

ACLU in Court Today Arguing that GPS Tracking Requires a Warrant

ACLU in Court Today Arguing that GPS Tracking Requires a Warrant

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 9:59am
Should law enforcement agents have to obtain a warrant based on probable cause to attach a GPS tracker to a vehicle and track its movements? Several months ago we asked the Third Circuit Court of Appeals to consider our argument that they should (you can read our amicus brief here). Today, we will be in court arguing that point in the case of Harry, Mark, and Michael Katzin.

ACLU Asks Appeals Court to Reconsider Cell Phone Tracking Decision

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:22pm

Yesterday we asked the full Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals to consider the arguments in our amicus brief that it should rehear a case decided by a three-judge panel in a ruling last month that undermined the privacy rights of everyone who carries a…

ACLU Seeks FBI Guidance Memos on GPS Tracking

ACLU Seeks FBI Guidance Memos on GPS Tracking

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:00pm

Is the FBI attaching GPS devices to cars, boats and planes and tracking them without a warrant? Even in the wake of the Supreme Court’s January decision in United States v. Jones, holding that attaching a GPS device to a car is covered by the Fourth…

In Congress Today: Testifying in Support of Geo-Privacy

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 5:23pm

Today I testified before the House Judiciary Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security Subcommittee in support of the Geolocational Privacy Surveillance Act, a law that would require law enforcement to obtain a warrant based upon probable cause before…

Surveillance Drones Coming to a Police Department Near You

Surveillance Drones Coming to a Police Department Near You

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 5:51pm

If there had been any doubt about drones being used for aerial surveillance inside the U.S., those doubts were dispelled when Congress passed and the president signed a law requiring the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to integrate drones…

Justice Department Avoids Decision On Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking

Justice Department Avoids Decision On Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 3:04pm

Federal law enforcement has used people’s cell phones to track their movements for at least a decade, but even today there is no clear answer to whether the government needs a warrant to do so. Why? In part because the U.S. Justice Department…

Better Than a Tinfoil Hat

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 4:06pm

Wired’s ThreatLevel blog published a list of “9 Reasons Wired Readers Should Wear Tinfoil Hats.” Well, that’s one option. But if you’re concerned about Big Brother tracking Americans’ movements or rifling through…

Justices Press Government on Limits of Warrantless Location Tracking

Justices Press Government on Limits of Warrantless Location Tracking

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 9:48am

Yesterday the Supreme Court heard argument in an important case that confronts how to apply Fourth Amendment's protections against unreasonable searches and seizures to new technologies.

Standing Up to Internet Censorship

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:01pm

In two different cases this week, the ACLU will be in court arguing that the government has unconstitutionally censored the Internet. Ever since the Supreme Court issued a fractured opinion on Internet filtering in 2003, when nine justices wrote…

Tracked: The Supreme Court Shouldn't Let Technology Trump the Constitution

Tracked: The Supreme Court Shouldn't Let Technology Trump the Constitution

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 12:59pm

This term the Supreme Court will determine if the government needs to establish probable cause and obtain a warrant before attaching a GPS device to a person's car.

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