Blog of Rights

David
Shapiro

David Shapiro is a staff attorney at the ACLU National Prison Project, where his work focuses on immigration detention, privatized incarceration, and prisoners' First Amendment rights. Before joining the ACLU, David worked as litigation associate at Davis Wright Tremaine LLP and as a law clerk to Judge Edward R. Becker of the U.S. Court of Appeals of the 3rd Circuit. David graduated from Yale Law School and Harvard College and studied Russian literature in Moscow as a Fulbright Scholar.

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Stop For-Profit Prisons

By David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 12:47pm

Today, the ACLU released Banking on Bondage: Private Prisons and Mass Incarceration, an in-depth examination of the private prison industry.

Say No to For-Profit Prisons

Say No to For-Profit Prisons

By David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 9:50am

Earlier this year, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the largest for-profit incarceration company in America, sent a letter to officials in 48 states offering to buy state prisons and run them for a profit. We're still waiting to hear what…

In Colorado, A New Breed of Degrading Search in Prisons

By David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 11:51am

The ACLU and ACLU of Colorado this week called upon the Colorado Department of Corrections to abandon a new policy that subjects prisoners to degrading body cavity searches. According to press reports and letters sent to the ACLU by prisoners at…

ACLU v. CCA: The Private Prison Debate Challenge

ACLU v. CCA: The Private Prison Debate Challenge

By David Fathi, National Prison Project & David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 3:37pm

Even as for-profit facilities lock up nearly 130,000 prisoners and take in billions of taxpayer dollars each year, these prisons remain shrouded in secrecy. The time has come for a robust public debate about the role of private prisons in our society.   

That’s…

A Sunny Day in Florida (Unless You're a Private Prison)

By David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 7:00pm

Today, the Florida Senate averted disaster by voting down a proposal to create the largest private prison system in America. The plan would have turned over nearly 30 Florida correctional facilities to private, for-profit companies, which have would…

What Do PETA and CCA Have in Common?

What Do PETA and CCA Have in Common?

By David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 4:12pm

Today, a broad coalition of 60 organizations called on states to reject the Corrections Corporation of America's proposal to state governors to buy prisons across the country.

Cast Your Ballot for the Worst Prison Innovation of 2011: With Solutions Like These, Who Needs Problems?

By David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 12:07pm

As 2011 comes to end, we’re taking a look back at the year in criminal justice. Over the next few days, we’ll run a series of blog posts on the developments, good and bad, that have shaped our justice system – from overincarceration…

A Tale of Two Communities . . . and Zero Private Prisons

A Tale of Two Communities . . . and Zero Private Prisons

By David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 11:21am

Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the world’s largest for-profit prison company, planned to contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to build a new private detention center.   Resistance by the local community…

All Dressed Up and No Prison CEO To Debate

All Dressed Up and No Prison CEO To Debate

By David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 3:18pm

Last week, we challenged Damon Hininger, the head of Corrections Corporation of America – the world’s largest for-profit incarceration company – to a debate on the merits of prison privatization. Today, Mother Jones reported…

Results of Our Poll for the Worst Prison Innovation of 2011: And the Loser Is...

By David Shapiro, ACLU National Prison Project at 2:24pm

In December, we asked you to pick among three candidates for the worst prison idea of 2011: denying prisoners lunch, charging families to visit prisoners or a pilot program in South Korea involving robotic correctional officers. You cast your votes,…

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