Blog of Rights

Larry
Schwartztol

Larry Schwartztol is a Staff Attorney in the ACLU’s Racial Justice Program.  He focuses primarily on litigation and advocacy at the intersection and racial and economic justice, mainly in the area of housing and lending.  He also works on litigation challenging aspects of the school-to-prison pipeline – policies and practices that expose students, disproportionately students of color, to the criminal justice system.  Previously, Larry was a staff attorney in the ACLU’s National Security Project, where he litigated cases involving foreign intelligence surveillance, ideological exclusion of foreign scholars, and the government’s search authority at airports and the U.S. border.  Before that, Larry litigated school equity cases as a Karpatkin Fellow in the Racial Justice Program and worked on voting rights issues as a Liman Fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University.  He clerked for Judge Harry T. Edwards of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.  Larry graduated from Yale Law School and received his B.A. from the University of Chicago.

From the Fair Housing Act to Ferguson: Where You Live Impacts How You're Policed

From the Fair Housing Act to Ferguson: Where You Live Impacts How You're Policed

By Larry Schwartztol, ACLU Racial Justice Program at 1:08pm
In less than 24 hours, the Supreme Court will hear a case that will define the future of decades-old legal protections against discrimination by landlords and banks against renters and homebuyers. The decision could have far-reaching consequences for the battle against housing policies that discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion, disability, and other protected characteristics. And that, in turn, would have profound implications for efforts to ensure fair and unbiased policing in places like Ferguson and New York City and throughout the country.
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