Blog of Rights

Mariko
Hirose

Appeal Brief in Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking FOIA Case Filed

By Mariko Hirose, Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 1:15pm
On Friday, the ACLU, the ACLU of the National Capital Area, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation filed our opening brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in the lawsuit to enforce our Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests regarding the government’s warrantless cell phone tracking practice.

A Victory for Cell Phone Users' Privacy

By Mariko Hirose, Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 5:22pm

Today, the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals decided (PDF) — in the first appellate opinion to address the issue — that the Stored Communications Act (SCA) protects historical cell phone location information from disclosure to the government,…

ACLU Challenges Laptop Searches and Seizures at the Border

By Mariko Hirose, Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 12:00am

Today, the ACLU, the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL) filed a lawsuit challenging the government's claimed authority to search, detain, and copy electronic devices —…

Judge: No Difference Between Cell Phone Tracking and GPS Vehicle Tracking

By Mariko Hirose, Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 5:15pm

A few weeks ago, we wrote about United States v. Maynard, a decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit requiring the government to obtain a warrant when it uses a GPS tracking device to monitor someone's movements.

Last…

Amazon Case: We're In!

By Mariko Hirose, Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:39pm

Last Friday, the district court in the Western District of Washington granted the motion to intervene that the ACLU filed on behalf of our clients in the lawsuit (PDF) challenging the North Carolina Department of Revenue’s (DOR) repeated requests…

A Win Against Warrantless GPS Tracking

By Mariko Hirose, Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 2:24pm

On Friday, a unanimous panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit decided (PDF) that the Fourth Amendment requires the government to obtain a warrant when it uses a GPS tracking device to monitor someone's movements for…

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