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Gill
The Perfect Gift for  Father's Day: Support the Every Child Deserves a Family Act

The Perfect Gift for Father's Day: Support the Every Child Deserves a Family Act

By Martin Gill at 5:08pm
This weekend will be the first Father's Day since the ACLU's landmark lawsuit in which, after a five-year legal battle, a court declared Florida's adoption ban unconstitutional, allowing me to be the legally recognized adoptive father of my two sons. Technically, this will be my first "real" Father's Day.

One Christmas Wish

By Martin Gill at 10:03am

(Originally posted on Pam's House Blend.)

Two weeks before Christmas in 2004, my partner and I got a call from the Department of Children and Families, asking us to take in two foster children. Although we'd taken in other kids in the past,…

Thankful for Being a Family One Day at a Time

By Martin Gill at 4:27pm

Thanksgiving will always be an extra special day in our family. Just before Thanksgiving last year, a Florida family court judge declared Florida’s gay adoption ban unconstitutional and allowed me to adopt two foster kids that my partner and…

Rally in Tally

By Martin Gill at 11:28am

Martin Gill, the plaintiff in the ACLU’s lawsuit seeking to overturn Florida law banning gay people from adopting, participated in the Rally in Tally today to urge Florida lawmakers to support LGBT equality. The following is the speech Martin gave at the rally.

Good afternoon,

Thank you for all for being here.

I was happy being a foster parent. My partner and I have fostered a total of 10 children. Eight of those 10 were later reunited with the biological families. That is the first goal of foster care — keeping families together. Sure, giving kids back to their families is one of the hardest parts of being a foster parent, but my partner and I support and believe in reunification whenever possible.

We got a call from a DCF worker in December of 2004 wanting to place two young brothers. My first response was "No." We had recently bought a home in Georgia and were planning to relocate. The case worker was persistent and assured us the placement would only be a month or two. I knew we could give these two boys a good Christmas. The thought of them spending Christmas in a shelter really broke my heart.

So we agreed. And for the next several months we were happy enough with that arrangement.

Then about a year into their placement, when the rights of their biological parents were terminated, we were told that the goal for the children had changed. It was now permanency, and for those two, that meant adoption.

Christmas at Home

By Martin Gill at 5:52pm

(Originally posted on The Bilerico Project)

Martin Gill and his partner have been raising two foster children in Florida since December 2004.  When a judge terminated the parental rights of the boys’ biological parents in 2006, Martin,…

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