This Is How Net Neutrality Will End

On June 11, net neutrality protections will cease to exist. This means your internet service provider will be able to engage in content based discrimination. Internet content it likes — for political or financial reasons — will be delivered at top speeds, while content it disfavors will be slowed or even blocked.

But will that start happening on day one? Almost certainly not, because the big telecoms that fought so hard to kill net neutrality are smarter than that.

It's not over: Tell Congress to restore Net Neutrality

Internet service providers spent millions of dollars lobbying the Federal Communications Commission to end net neutrality, and they are certainly going to expect a healthy return on that investment. While the ISPs are clearly focused on increasing their profits, here the ISPs are likely to be patient. Their wisest course of action will be to eliminate net neutrality like a slow drip over time in the hope that consumers won’t notice and will stop caring.

The big telecoms know that bipartisan legislation to reject the FCC’s abandonment of net neutrality is pending before the House, after being approved by the Senate last month. They know that 86 percent of all Americans favor restoring the FCC’s net neutrality rules. And they know that three state legislatures and six state governors have already adopted pro-net neutrality measures and that many more are considering joining their ranks.

Given this environment, the ISPs are unlikely to engage in visible, net neutrality violating behavior right away.

Shortly after casting his vote in favor of the Senate bill to preserve net neutrality, Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.) said, “If you trust your cable company, you’re not going to like my vote today. If you don’t trust your cable company, you will.”

Kennedy’s analysis is certainly correct, but his comments also hint at what likely is the next step in the ISPs’ net neutrality playbook: Once June 11 comes and goes, we should expect the ISPs will do little to nothing in response. Then, after some time has passed, they will point to their inaction as proof we were wrong to distrust them and their promises not to violate net neutrality in the absence of a federal mandate. And guess what will happen next? Drip. Drip. Drip. And before we know it, a flood will have washed away the free and open internet we all rely on.

So yes, net neutrality will be gone on June 11. When we will first feel the impact of that loss is unknown, but what is known is that the fight is far from over.

To bring net neutrality protections back, call your member of Congress and insist they vote to join the Senate’s effort under the Congressional Review Act to save net neutrality. For extra effect, when you talk to your member of Congress, be certain to mention that net neutrality will be on your mind when you go to the polls in November.

Although we may have lost net neutrality in the short run, if the 82 percent of Republicans, 90 percent of Democrats, and 85 percent of independents who favor net neutrality make their voices heard, there is no doubt we will win in the end.

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Bill

It is really all about the money - getting more of it.

Most likely, what we are going to see on the consumer side is tiered packages that look like cable TV packages that are marketed as, “enhancements,” when they are in reality just removal of artificially hobbled access. Want to watch YouTube?, sign up for the Watchers Package. Want to play games?, get Gamers Choice. And so on.

Content providers are going to get a double whammy. Content providers will, of course, pay the networks to which they are directlly attached. Next content providers will have to pay other networks to be included in those distant networks’ premium packs. A video blogger in California might have to pay Comcast in New York if she wants to have her show able to be seen on the east coast. Tier 1 transit service providers might start charging content providers to admit their content either into or out of the Continental United States.

It is another move toward making everything one does I life both monitored and subscription based.

Anonymous

Bullshit, Congress does what’s best for their own pocket books. They don’t give a fuck if they get a call from literally every person in the country. Anyone who thinks we will regain our rights and control of our government through non-violent means is naive and childish.

Anonymous

The thing is, they don’t know how important this is to us Americans.

TBBEX

I think this is good that they are repealing it. From day 1 of the internet to Feb 26, 2018, there was no net neutrality. I feel that it puts a burden on the ISPs. Our economic system, Capitalism, allows the people to create a business and run it without the government intervening in it and telling what to do and how much to sell it for. This allows complete freedom to the ISPs.

Anonymous

Completel freedom, which they've abused repeatedly prior to Net Neutrality. Capitalism, in the case of ISPs, does not offer the tools we need to prevent ISPs from adopting predatory business practices.

Anonymous

Similarly, I wish it were legal for the mob to charge me to see my family alive. It's quite a great capitalistic opportunity! Either we live in a world where you can extort people, or we live in a world with such UNNECESSARY REGULATORY BURDON.

The poor mob has been regulated out of existence these days.

Anonymous

Even if the house does overturn it, trump has the chance to veto it, and knowing him.... he probably will, GOSH DARNIT TRUMP!!!

Anonymous

Ajit Pai is a Dumb man and is a corporate tool who needs to be INVESTIGATED.

Anonymous

The US Federal government is in an objectively failed and fallen state. Fascism will be torn down, but many lives will never be made whole again. In general, people's imaginations have failed to envision how dark things can get, but when the darkness hits you, you'll be disenfranchised, disempowered, and your life will have become a shadow of the potential it once held. It's already happening now, and the bottom will drop out fast. You were warned, but you placed your faith in a corrupt system expecting someone else to do the heavy lifting of liberal democracy. You put the shackles and the blindfolds on willingly, and by relinquishing your free will, you've lost control of your fates.

Anonymous

Can i still use the internet without paying if i use the slow lane. And we haven't even seen these rules yet so people are making bullshit up.

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