WATCH: In His Former Life as Alabama’s Attorney General, Jeff Sessions Abused His Power and Was Read the Riot Act Over It

It is now well-known that Jeff Sessions’ record as a senator shows blindness or hostility to the rights of those the attorney general is responsible for protecting — people of color, women, LGBT people, religious minorities, and immigrants. Less well known, but equally disturbing, is his record as a prosecutor. When he last exercised the power of a prosecutor, as attorney general for Alabama in the 1990s, he abused that power. 

The biggest case his office handled was thrown out in what the judge called the worst case of prosecutorial misconduct he had ever seen. In a remarkable opinion, the Alabama state trial judge hearing the case concluded that “the misconduct of the Attorney General in this case far surpasses in both extensiveness and measure the totality of any prosecutorial misconduct ever previously presented to or witnessed by the Court.”

The court found that the “the prosecutorial misconduct is so pronounced and persistent that it permeates the entire atmosphere of this prosecution and warrants a dismissal of these cases.” It also found the misconduct so pervasive that “this court can only conclude it is dealing with either intentional and deliberate misconduct or conduct so reckless and improper as to constitute conscious disregard for the lawful duties of the Attorney General and the integrity and dignity of this court and this Judge.”

Sessions’ office filed a 222-count indictment against a business competitor of a company that was contributing to Sessions’ first senatorial campaign, using the power of his office to intervene in a private business dispute. The court dismissed every count of the indictment — some as baseless, but others because of egregious prosecutorial misconduct. 

Senators must ask themselves: Should we be confirming a man to the most powerful prosecutor’s office in the country who has a record of prosecutorial abuse? 

For more, see our written testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee or this clip of ACLU National Legal Director David Cole discussing the case on The Rachel Maddow Show: 

David Cole Rachel Maddow Thumb
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Susan

Explain to me, someone, how Trump could even nominate this bigoted lunatic,much less how anyone could even consider confirming him. Our country will go up in flames and no one will step up to put it out with anything more effective than a water pistol. This. Is. NOT. Normal.

Anonymous

God help us if he becomes attorney general ! We are doomed !

Anonymous

Maybe Senate Democrats can ask Bill Smith and see if Buzzfeed has some evidence of Sen. Session's racism.

Anonymous

Sessions and the rest of the crazies Trump has nominated are going to set this country back into the 1950's or earlier and it will take our great country years to recover. How do they get stopped? More pressure is needed to get their nominations stopped.

Anonymous

The judge for the jury on which I sat thought both the prosecution AND the defense could do that. In fact before the trial ever started he had one piece of public advice: "This case is in the public eye and it's going to be all over the news in this area. For that reason I'm not going to tolerate the usual antics by the prosecution and defense."
It was quite the shocking thing to hear for me since I thought only the Defense did it. I was the victim of a crime 2 times and saw them play those games each time. I know the Defense does it too and I have no idea why they never mention it on this site.
If it weren't for Defense attorneys Helen Short probably would have been sentenced to death. Not giving her death was INhumane to everyone except her and since she still feels no remorse for anything she did, even blamed Cathy Whitehead (her victim) for the murder, it did nothing to help Helen Short either.
I think if people hadn't been so gd exTREME about certain things Clinton might have ALSO won the ELECTORAL vote, but you guys have to sit around feeling overwhelming tons of sorrow for the people who killed almost 3,000 people on September 11 and never expressing any concern for the real victims. You take one day to notice something terrible happened to them and then spend the rest of the year trying to free someone who knows damn well he indoctrinated the other 3 suicide pilots into Al Qaeda. As Richard, my other half, said "The minute he saw the names of who had gone on the mission, he knew it was he that indoctrinated them."
It doesn't make any f'n difference to ME (who knows one of the people who died that day) if he "didn't know at the exact moment in time when he specifically asked them to be indoctrinated. Sooner or later he read the names of who had done it and right at that second he knew he had helped do it and he's got no gd excuse for himself. Not in my mind but I don't believe I'm being "too emotional" in that instance because Richard brought it up. He's almost never as emotionally charged as I am about things. Anyway it rings more logical than emotional.
If people could ever admit that some people exist who ARE capable of disgusting unspeakable things and it's more than ONLY people from the right.

Anonymous

Can i ask more specifically who you are referring to that is responsible for indoctrinating the three 9/11 suicide pilots?

Anonymous

Can i ask more specifically who you are referring to that is responsible for indoctrinating the three 9/11 suicide pilots?

Anonymous

I have tried carefully to find the citation for this decision, but a search of Google Scholar turned up nothing. Thoughts? If anyone knows it, please contact me per mnchapter13.com.

Jane Citizen

America is not "doomed" as long as we, the people, stand up for our rights. Don't despair, fight. They only win if we let them.

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