GPS

ACLU Sues FBI for New GPS Tracking Memos

By Adrienne Lucas, Legal Intern, Speech, Privacy & Technology Project at 3:32pm
Today the ACLU filed a lawsuit under the Freedom of Information Act to force the FBI to release two memos guiding the bureau’s policy on GPS tracking. The memos were written in the wake of the Supreme Court’s January decision in U.S. v. Jones, which held that the Fourth Amendment applies when the government secretly attaches a GPS device to a car and tracks its movements. (See today’s legal complaint, our original FOIA request (made July 18), and a blog post we wrote about that request).
Fighting for Transparency

Fighting for Transparency

By Linda Lye, Staff Attorney, ACLU of Northern California at 4:51pm

Today, the ACLU of Northern California went to court in two separate cases with the same goal: shedding light on the government's use of controversial and arguably unconstitutional surveillance techniques.

Free Future Friday links roundup

Free Future Friday links roundup

By Jay Stanley, Senior Policy Analyst, ACLU Speech, Privacy & Technology Project at 10:20am

A few links that have caught our eye this past week:

The Citynewswatch blog in Charlotte, NC has a nice post on that city’s new license plate reader program, among other surveillance systems (pity any city that hosts a major national…

Justice Department Avoids Decision On Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking

Justice Department Avoids Decision On Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 3:04pm

Federal law enforcement has used people’s cell phones to track their movements for at least a decade, but even today there is no clear answer to whether the government needs a warrant to do so. Why? In part because the U.S. Justice Department…

VIDEO: Justices Take on Warrantless GPS Tracking

VIDEO: Justices Take on Warrantless GPS Tracking

By Josh Bell, Media Strategist, ACLU at 10:06am

Today the Supreme Court is hearing arguments in a case that’s likely to affect the privacy rights of anyone who carries a cell phone. The case, U.S. v. Jones, is about whether law enforcement needs a warrant before planting a GPS tracking…

D.C. Judge: Government Doesn't Need a Warrant to Demand Cell Phone Location Information

D.C. Judge: Government Doesn't Need a Warrant to Demand Cell Phone Location Information

By Chris Conley, Staff Attorney, ACLU of Northern California Technology and Civil Liberties Project at 10:39am

Can the government demand location information records from your carrier without a warrant? Unfortunately, a D.C. District Court judge thinks so.

Your iPhone "Location Diary" and Apple's Inadequate Response

Your iPhone "Location Diary" and Apple's Inadequate Response

By Jay Stanley, Senior Policy Analyst, ACLU Speech, Privacy & Technology Project at 6:02pm

Apple has finally responded to the revelation that iPhone and iPads keep records of their users' whereabouts. We're glad that Apple has promised to change this practice. At the same time, nobody should think of this dust-up as some overblown quirk…

In Court Thursday: Demanding the Justice Department’s Secret Memos on GPS Location Tracking

In Court Thursday: Demanding the Justice Department’s Secret Memos on GPS Location Tracking

By Brian Hauss, Legal Fellow, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 10:41am

I will be in court tomorrow to argue that the Justice Department must release two key memos...

ACLU in Court Today Arguing that GPS Tracking Requires a Warrant

ACLU in Court Today Arguing that GPS Tracking Requires a Warrant

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 9:59am

Should law enforcement agents have to obtain a warrant based on probable cause to attach a GPS tracker to a vehicle and track its movements? Several months ago we asked the Third Circuit Court of Appeals to consider our argument that they should (you…

New York Court Decision Highlights Yet Another Shortcoming In Nation’s Outdated Electronic Privacy Laws

New York Court Decision Highlights Yet Another Shortcoming In Nation’s Outdated Electronic Privacy Laws

By Catherine Crump, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project at 1:02pm

A recent cell phone tracking case from New York is both a win and loss for privacy. In People v. Moorer, police officers submitted an emergency or “exigent circumstances” request to a phone company asking it to ping (locate) a cell phone—but…

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