U.S. Torture

Pardon Bush and Those Who Tortured

Pardon Bush and Those Who Tortured

By Anthony D. Romero, Executive Director, ACLU at 12:54pm
This piece originally appeared on The New York Times opinion page.
Required Reading: Prequels to the Torture Report

Required Reading: Prequels to the Torture Report

By Marcellene Hearn, Senior Staff Attorney, ACLU National Security Project at 2:17pm

As early as tomorrow, the long-awaited Senate torture report will finally see the light of day. If all goes as planned, the Senate Intelligence Committee will release the roughly 500-page executive summary of its 6,000-page report concerning the CIA's…

Those Who Approved Torture Shouldn't Be Above the Law

Those Who Approved Torture Shouldn't Be Above the Law

By Jameel Jaffer, ACLU Deputy Legal Director and Director of ACLU Center for Democracy at 10:23am

This piece originally appeared at MSNBC.com.

The Senate report released earlier this week makes clear that the CIA tortured more men, and far more brutally, than anyone outside the intelligence community previously understood. Given the report's…

No, Senator, You Can’t Have the Torture Report Back (UPDATED)

No, Senator, You Can’t Have the Torture Report Back (UPDATED)

By Ashley Gorski, Nadine Strossen Fellow, National Security Project, ACLU at 5:44pm

Update (2/10/15): It looks like Senator Burr won’t get the torture report back, after all! In response to our emergency motion, filed late last month, the government has committed to “preserving the status quo” – in other words, it will hold…

After Torture Report, Lawsuit Tests U.S. Commitment to Accountability

After Torture Report, Lawsuit Tests U.S. Commitment to Accountability

By Jonathan Hafetz, Associate Professor of Law, Seton Hall University School of Law at 10:25am

A week after the release of the executive summary of Senate Intelligence Committee's torture report, the world's attention is rightly focused on the flagrant abuses committed by CIA officials in the name of national security. But it would be mistake…

"A Train Wreck Waiting to Happen": Shocking Stories from the Senate's Torture Report

"A Train Wreck Waiting to Happen": Shocking Stories from the Senate's Torture Report

By Noa Yachot, Communications Strategist, ACLU at 4:20pm

In the last 24 hours, pundits have spoken at length about the Senate Intelligence Committee's landmark torture report, the executive summary of which was released yesterday. For good reason. Despite all of the leaks, the previously released documents,…

The US's Story of Torture Doesn't Have to End With Impunity

The US's Story of Torture Doesn't Have to End With Impunity

By Hina Shamsi, Director, ACLU National Security Project at 5:16pm

After five long years of investigation, declassification, and redaction – not to mention outright obstruction by the CIA – the Senate Intelligence Committee today shone more light on CIA torture and made a historic and necessary contribution to…

The Torture Secrets Are Coming

The Torture Secrets Are Coming

By Marcellene Hearn, Senior Staff Attorney, ACLU National Security Project at 11:44am

Once you've seen the Abu Ghraib photos, they're not easily forgotten.

The hooded man, the electrodes, the naked bodies piled upon each other, and the grinning soldier with a thumbs up. The images are the stuff of nightmares. They're also incontrovertible…

The Obama Administration's 2 Faces on Releasing Evidence of U.S. Prisoner Abuse

The Obama Administration's 2 Faces on Releasing Evidence of U.S. Prisoner Abuse

By Josh Bell, Media Strategist, ACLU at 10:00am

There is too often a gap between the Obama administration's words and deeds when it comes to transparency on national security issues. Take, for example, whether the government should release information about the abuse of prisoners in U.S. custody.

In…

Guantánamo Diary: An Epic for Our Times

Guantánamo Diary: An Epic for Our Times

By Noa Yachot, Communications Strategist, ACLU at 1:33pm

Literary history was made today with the publication of the first-ever book by a still-imprisoned Guantánamo detainee. Mohamedou Ould Slahi's "Guantánamo Diary" was finally published with some redactions after years of litigation to declassify it.

Slahi–…

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