Waterboarding

Waterboarding is a torture technique that simulates drowning. The technique was authorized by Justice Department attorneys during the George W. Bush administration for use on detainees captured in the "War on Terror."
Book Review: "Hard Measures"

Book Review: "Hard Measures"

By Alex Abdo, Staff Attorney, ACLU National Security Project at 11:03am
In an email sent to potential supporters a few days before releasing his book on CIA torture, Jose Rodriguez, the former head of the CIA’s Counterterrorism Center and its former Deputy Director of Operations, complained that his book, Hard Measures, would “be attacked from many quarters—mostly by people who will never read it.” 
For “Civic Hacking Day,” We’re Opening Our Torture Database to Developers

For “Civic Hacking Day,” We’re Opening Our Torture Database to Developers

By Alex Abdo, Staff Attorney, ACLU National Security Project at 10:59am

This Saturday and Sunday, June 1 and 2, mark the first annual National Day of Civic Hacking. The ACLU is participating by enabling developers to access our Torture Database and in turn make this information even more accessible to the public. Starting…

President Obama, Don’t Let the CIA Control the Torture Narrative

President Obama, Don’t Let the CIA Control the Torture Narrative

By Matthew Harwood, Media Strategist, ACLU at 5:41pm

When former White House counterterrorism advisor John Brennan went before the Senate in early February for his confirmation hearing to lead the CIA, he made a startling admission. After reading the 300-page summary of the Senate Select Committee on…

60 Minutes Spotlights Ham-Handed CIA Torture

60 Minutes Spotlights Ham-Handed CIA Torture

By Devon Chaffee, Legislative Policy Counsel, ACLU Washington Legislative Office at 2:18pm

Last night former CIA chief Jose Rodriguez appeared on 60 Minutes to promote his new book defending his role in the CIA's torture program and his decision to order that tapes of the torture sessions be destroyed. While Rodriguez regurgitated …

CIA: We Do Not "Concede or Not Concede" that Waterboarding is Illegal

CIA: We Do Not "Concede or Not Concede" that Waterboarding is Illegal

By Alex Abdo, Staff Attorney, ACLU National Security Project & Mitra Ebadolahi, Border Litigation Staff Attorney, ACLU of San Diego & Imperial Counties at 1:45pm

On Friday, the ACLU appeared before the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York to argue that the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requires the CIA to release documents describing its use of waterboarding. The simple question at the heart of…

Twisted Logic and the New Book by the CIA Spy Who Destroyed Torture Tapes

Twisted Logic and the New Book by the CIA Spy Who Destroyed Torture Tapes

By Alex Abdo, Staff Attorney, ACLU National Security Project at 4:03pm

On Monday, the latest installment in the defense of torture — Hard Measures, by Jose Rodriguez — will hit bookshelves. Rodriguez, the former head of the CIA's Counterterrorism Center and its former Deputy Director of Operations, will…

The Machinery of Death: Witness to Al-Nashiri’s First Guantánamo Hearing

By Zachary Katznelson, Senior Staff Attorney, ACLU National Security Project at 1:25pm

Yesterday, the man accused of planning the 2000 U.S.S. Cole bombing appeared before the world for the first time, nine years after his capture, at a military commission hearing at Guantánamo. I was there to observe the proceedings for the…

James Comey: Two Thumbs-Up on Waterboarding?

James Comey: Two Thumbs-Up on Waterboarding?

By Chris Anders, Senior Legislative Counsel, ACLU Washington Legislative Office at 2:00pm

Waterboarding and other torture tactics may once again take center stage in yet another nomination fight. But this time, the stakes involve a ten-year appointment to head the FBI.

Before President Obama nominates—and certainly before the…

Appeals Court Says CIA Can Hide Torture Evidence from Public

Appeals Court Says CIA Can Hide Torture Evidence from Public

By Alex Abdo, Staff Attorney, ACLU National Security Project at 1:52pm

Earlier this week, a federal appeals court ruled that the CIA can effectively decide for itself what Americans are allowed to learn about the torture committed in their name. At issue in the ACLU’s long-running Freedom of Information Act lawsuit…

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