Workplace Privacy

Workplace Privacy

Many of the basic rights we all take for granted are not protected when we go to work. In fact, the ACLU receives more complaints about privacy in the workplace than about any other issue. The ACLU continues to fight for employee privacy by challenging how those rights are violated by employers through workplace surveillance, unwarranted drug testing and "lifestyle discrimination."

Resources
Through the Keyhole: Privacy in the Workplace, an Endangered Right (1998): Many of the basic rights we all take for granted are not protected when we go to work. In fact, the ACLU receives more complaints about workplace rights violations than about any other issue.

Privacy in America: Electronic Monitoring (1997): Employers can read you e-mail, look at your personal computer files and eavesdrop on your phone calls. They can film you with hidden video cameras not only in public areas, but in locker rooms and even restrooms.

More Stores Now Spy on Employees (2001): Retail store owners are increasingly using advanced technology to spy on employees, and civil liberties advocates say that such surveillance is invasive and, in many cases, excessive, The New York Times reported. 

Legislative Briefing Kit: Electronic Monitoring (1998): Through advanced technology, employers can now continuously monitor employees' actions without the employee even knowing he or she is being "watched." The computer's eye is unblinking and ever-present. Sophisticated software allows every minute of the day to be recorded and evaluated. Human workers are being tracked like machines by machines

Most Popular

Lifestyle Discrimination in the Workplace Your Right to Privacy Under Attack (2002)

 

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